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JTM’s Monthly Safeguarding Bulletin – August 2018

Topics for this month:

World Suicide Prevention Day: 10th September 2018

Unfortunately one person dies every 40 seconds by suicide and up to 25 times as many again make a suicide attempt. There are also many more people who have been bereaved by suicide or have been close to someone who has made an attempt. This World Suicide Prevention Day event is about the global community, encouraging people to engage with each other and to join together to spread awareness of suicide prevention, by collectively ‘Cycling Around the Globe’.

Click here for more information;

For more information about how you or someone you know can get involved, please click the following link: https://iasp.info/wspd2018/cycle-around-the-globe-participants-and-distances/

The importance of ‘taking a minute’ to reach out to someone, whether it is a friend, colleague or family member to ask how they are, can make a huge difference. Read the attached leaflet for more information, or visithttps://iasp.info/wspd2018/ or visit https://www.samaritans.org/media-centre/our-campaigns/world-suicide-prevention-day

World Alzheimer’s Month: September 2018

Every year, World Alzheimer’s Day takes place on 21st September, and is the focus of ‘World Alzheimer’s Month’ in September. Globally, dementia is one of the biggest challenges, with nearly 50 million people living with dementia worldwide. You can help fund vital research by joining 100,000 people on a memory walk, united against dementia.

To find your nearest memory walk, click on the following link: https://www.memorywalk.org.uk/find-a-walk/

What are Parental Controls?

Parental controls are features that may be included in new technology such as personal computers, laptops, tablets, computer and video games, computer software, mobile phones and digital television services. These controls can be used to limit access to only age appropriate content, to set usage times and limits and to monitor activity.

Click here for more information;

The 4 big internet providers in the UK: BT, Sky, TalkTalk and Virgin Media, provide their customers with free parental controls which can be activated at any time. Guides for these can be found at: https://www.saferinternet.org.uk/advice-centre/parents-and-carers/parental-controls-offered-your-home-internet-provider

Domestic Abuse Toolkit for Employers

1 in 4 women and 1 in 6 men suffer from domestic abuse in their lifetime, and an estimated 1.9 million adults aged 16-59 experienced domestic abuse in the last year. There was an average of less than one disclosure to employers within medium and large organisation over the past 12 months, which suggests not enough employees feel supported to raise the problem. Please access the attached toolkit

Click here for more information;

Did you know?…

95% of teen social media users say they have a Facebook profile, 50% have a Instagram account  and 33% of teens use Snapchat. However, 35% are worried about people tagging them in unattractive photos and 27% feel stressed about how they look in posted photos.  It is important that we discuss with young adults the use of social media and the pressures they may feel that they are under to portray a ‘perfect’ image. This can have implications on their mental health and affect their wellbeing. For more information please follow: https://youngminds.org.uk/

Five ways that you can help young people feel good about themselves:

  • Avoid social comparison
  • Focus on their own talents and strengths
  • Improve and maintain physical activity for their own wellbeing
  • Believe in themselves
  • Help and be kind to others around them

JTM’s Monthly Safeguarding Bulletin – July 2018

Topics for this month:

Sun Safety

The Teenage Cancer Trust found that 61% of young people aged 13-24 have avoided using sunscreen in order to get a ‘better tan’. As the weather gets hotter, we need to be more knowledgeable about keeping safe in the sun than ever before.

The damage done to young skin can lead to skin cancer developing in later life, so it’s vital to help young people protect themselves in the sun. The teenage cancer trust have launched a safety campaign to help raise awareness of how to stay safe in the sun. https://www.teenagecancertrust.org/support-us/spread-word/shunburn-stay-safe-sun?mc_cid=ef21693c4e&mc_eid=52c3e86d31 

Safety at Music Festivals

Many of our learners may be spending time over the summer attending festivals. Going to a festival can be an amazing experience, but there are hazards and people need to be aware of how they can keep themselves safe. A website called Festival Safe has information for whether it is their first time and what they are to expect, camping advice, alcohol and drugs advice and much more.

Please access this link and information so that you know how to keep yourself safe. https://www.festivalsafe.com/?mc_cid=187a85b3dd&mc_eid=52c3e86d31

#NoMoreKnives Campaign

As knife crime in the UK continues to rise, there are a number of campaigns launched around the UK, particularly in Liverpool, to help prevent Knife crime in the city. After Sam Cook’s death and the fatal stabbing of Adam Ellison; Police, local radio stations and newspapers, Liverpool City Council, local boxing and sports clubs, Liverpool John Moores University and many more, are all supporting the campaign to help raise awareness around the city.

ITV news worked with Aintree hospital to produce a short film to show how the emergency services are handling the troubling increase of knife crime. The film was broadcast and can be found here: https://twitter.com/itvnews/status/1020024306926047233

Radicalisation

An overview leaflet has been designed to help capture the information of;

  • Protecting Children and Young People from radical influence
  • How radicalisation occurs
  • What are the warning signs
  • Sign posting and useful contacts

Click here for more information;

Did you know?…

According to a 2017 report, online jihadist propaganda gets more clicks in Britain than in any other European country. (The New Netwar: Countering Extremism Online – Policy Exchange Sept 2017)

Updated Guidance: Working together to Safeguard Children 2018

The guidance for ‘Working Together to safeguard children’ has now been updated to reflect changes in the law, including the Children and Social Work Act (2017). This guidance should be read alongside the ‘Keeping children safe in Education’ which both set out the responsibilities and duties schools, colleges and educational providers have when safeguarding children and promoting their welfare.

JTM’s Monthly Safeguarding Bulletin – June 2018

Topics for this month:

World Cup 2018:

Researchers from Lancaster University studied incidents of domestic abuse during the World Cup matches in 2002, 2006 and 2010, and found a 38% rise on days when the England team played and lost, and a 26% rise when England won or drew. In 2016, BBC Radio 4 covered this issue during their ‘Thinking Allowed’ programme and a researcher from the University of Chester spoke about her findings which included that her study revealed that women endured a range of harms, including physical, sexual and economic abuse as well as coercive and controlling behaviours. While the abuse wasn’t limited to sport, sport was a means through which their fanatical partners exerted power and maintained control over them.

To raise awareness of domestic abuse, anti-social behaviour and racist abuse, Suffolk police have designed posters which may help if we need to help individuals or sign post them to relevant help and support.

Sign posting:

Website and also a 24 hour National Domestic Violence Freephone Helpline:0808 2000 247

Click here for more information;

Click here form more information;

http://www.nationaldomesticviolencehelpline.org.uk/?mc_cid=5f002a46cb&mc_eid=52c3e86d31


Women’s Aid have created this website to help children and young people to understand domestic abuse, and how to take positive action if it’s happening to them

Updated Bullying Definition

A YouGov poll revealed that 72% of GB children, aged 13-17 years, agreed that the definition of ‘bully’ should be updated. After campaigning by the Diana Award, Google, Collins, Dictionary.com, Oxford Dictionaries and the Cambridge Dictionary, have changed their definition of bullying.

The original definition described bullies as being ‘strong’ and their victims being ‘weak’, but the new definition instead, highlights ‘vulnerabilities’.

Original definition: Bully – A person who uses strength or influence to harm or intimidate those who are weaker.

New definition: Bully – A person who habitually seeks to harm or intimidate whose who, they perceive as vulnerable.

Are you interested in an apprenticeship?

What’s an apprenticeship?

It’s a genuine job, with training, meaning you can earn while you learn and gain the necessary skills and professional competencies in your chosen career.

 

What can I earn?

The minimum wage for apprentices is £3.50 per hour, but many employers pay more than this. This is dependent on the sector, region and apprenticeship level e.g. some higher apprenticeships pay up to £500 per week.

More details on salaries and entry criteria in specific apprenticeship occupations can be found on GOV.UK and search ‘apprenticeships’.

 

What levels are there?

All apprenticeships include elements of on the job and off the job training leading to industry recognised standards or qualifications. Some apprenticeships also require an assessment at the end of the programme to assess the apprentice’s ability and competence in their job role.

 

What’s in it for me?

  • Earn a real wage
  • Be trained in the skills employers want
  • You are more likely to progress quicker and higher than a typical student
  • Learn at a pace that suits you and be supported by a mentor
  • Have annual holidays
  • You will set yourself up for the future – apprentices enjoy marked salary increases when they complete their training, and those completing a higher apprenticeship could see increased earnings of an estimated £150,000 over their lifetime.

 

Entry requirements

Apprenticeships are available to anyone over the age of 16, living in England. There are different entry requirements depending on the sector and job. 7

Recent legislation has come into effect which changes the minimum English and maths requirements needed to complete an apprenticeship for people with a learning difficulty or disability. The changes will lower the English and maths requirements for these apprentices to an Entry Level 3 qualification.

A Disability Confident Employer will generally offer an interview to any applicant that declares they have a disability and meets the minimum criteria as defined by the employer. For more details search Disability Confident on GOV.UK.

Employer guide to apprenticeships

What is an apprenticeship?

An apprenticeship is a genuine job with an accompanying assessment and skills development programme. It is a way for individuals to earn while they learn gaining valuable skills and knowledge in a specific job role. The apprentice gains this through a wide mix of learning in the workplace, formal off-the-job training and the opportunity to practise new skills in a real work environment. Apprenticeships benefit employers and individuals, and by boosting the skills of the workforce they help to improve economic productivity.

How do they work?

Apprentices must spend at least 20% of their time on off-the-job training, however, they may need more than this if, for example, they need training in English and maths. It is up to the employer and training provider to decide how the off-the-job training is delivered. It may include regular day release, block release and special training days or workshops. It must be directly relevant to the apprenticeship framework or standard and can be delivered at the apprentice’s normal place of work if it is not part of their normal working duties. It can cover practical training such as shadowing, mentoring, industry visits and attending competitions. On-the-job training helps an apprentice develop the specific skills for the workplace and they should be supported by a mentor. Once an apprentice completes their apprenticeship they should be able to demonstrate that they can perform tasks confidently and completely to the standard set by industry.

Who are they for?

Individuals over the age of 16, spending at least 50% of their working hours in England over the duration of their apprenticeship and not in full-time education can apply for an apprenticeship. Employers can offer apprenticeships to new entrants or use them to grow talent from among current employees. Apprenticeships equip individuals with the necessary skills knowledge and behaviour they need for specific job roles, future employment and progression.

Benefits of hiring apprentices

Hiring an apprentice is a productive and effective way for any business to grow talent and develop a motivated, skilled and qualified workforce. Employers who have an established apprenticeship programme reported that productivity in their workplace had improved by 76% whilst 75% reported that apprenticeships improved the quality of their product or service. Other benefits that apprenticeships contribute towards include:

  • Increasing employee satisfaction
  • Reducing staff turnover
  • Reducing recruitment costs

What is an apprenticeship?

An apprenticeship is a genuine job with an accompanying assessment and skills development programme. It is a way for individuals to earn while they learn gaining valuable skills and knowledge in a specific job role. The apprentice gains this through a wide mix of learning in the workplace, formal off-the-job training and the opportunity to practise new skills in a real work environment. Apprenticeships benefit employers and individuals, and by boosting the skills of the workforce they help to improve economic productivity.

How do they work?

Apprentices must spend at least 20% of their time on off-the-job training, however, they may need more than this if, for example, they need training in English and maths. It is up to the employer and training provider to decide how the off-the-job training is delivered. It may include regular day release, block release and special training days or workshops. It must be directly relevant to the apprenticeship framework or standard and can be delivered at the apprentice’s normal place of work if it is not part of their normal working duties. It can cover practical training such as shadowing, mentoring, industry visits and attending competitions. On-the-job training helps an apprentice develop the specific skills for the workplace and they should be supported by a mentor. Once an apprentice completes their apprenticeship they should be able to demonstrate that they can perform tasks confidently and completely to the standard set by industry.

Who are they for?

Individuals over the age of 16, spending at least 50% of their working hours in England over the duration of their apprenticeship and not in full-time education can apply for an apprenticeship. Employers can offer apprenticeships to new entrants or use them to grow talent from among current employees. Apprenticeships equip individuals with the necessary skills knowledge and behaviour they need for specific job roles, future employment and progression.

Benefits of hiring apprentices

Hiring an apprentice is a productive and effective way for any business to grow talent and develop a motivated, skilled and qualified workforce. Employers who have an established apprenticeship programme reported that productivity in their workplace had improved by 76% whilst 75% reported that apprenticeships improved the quality of their product or service. Other benefits that apprenticeships contribute towards include:

  • Increasing employee satisfaction
  • Reducing staff turnover
  • Reducing recruitment costs

For further information see the link below:

Employer_guide_to_apprenticeships_03.11.2017

 

Top anti-bullying tips:

  • It doesn’t matter what colour hair you have; what trainers you are wearing; how you speak; how you walk; how you talk – it is not your fault if you get bullied. We are all different in some way and that’s what makes us amazing.
  • Whether you are a boy or a girl, old or young, big or small – bullying makes you feel rubbish and it’s okay to be upset about it. The important thing is that you tell someone about it.
  • Keep a record of what happened, when it happened, and who was involved. If the bullying is online, keep the evidence – save or copy any photos, videos, texts, emails or posts.
  •  It can be tempting if you are being bullied to retaliate – for example to send a horrible message back to someone; to try and embarrass and hurt the other person, or to fight back. This is not a good idea– you might end up being seen as the trouble maker or get yourself even more hurt.
  • Remember to be kind to other people! Just because someone is different to you and your friends – that doesn’t mean you are better than them or have a right to make them feel bad. If you mess up, say sorry. You don’t have to be friends with everyone – but you should always show respect, make it clear that you don’t like it when people bully others, and stick up for people who are having a hard time.

    Take a look below at JTM’s poster for anti-bullying week !

anti bullying week poster (social media) 

 

 

Are you up to date with the new Snapchat feature, Snapmaps?

Snapchat is a mobile app that allows you to send videos and pictures to your Snapchat contacts, but will disappear after a few seconds of the person viewing them. Snapchat also allows you to send direct messages, where you can capture a photo or brief video, add a caption or filter over the top, and then send the finished ‘snap’ to a friend.

Alternatively, you can also add your snap to your “story”, which is a  collection of your snaps that are live for your contacts to view for 24 hours only, and then will also disappear.

Last week, Snapchat released a new feature called ‘Snapmaps’.  This allows users to see where in the country their Snapchat contacts are, as well as seeing location based photos and videos. This feature allows others to accurately pinpoint where you are. There are three possible privacy settings:

  • Ghost mode, where only you can see your position;
  • My Friends mode, where any contact can see your location; and
  • Select Friends mode, just those who you choose can see you

Read Childnet’s guide on how to change your settings in order to stay safe, whilst using the app

http://www.childnet.com/blog/introducing-snap-maps-the-new-location-sharing-feature-in-snapchat

‘New’ Apprenticeship Standards – 5 FAQ’s

From May, JTM will be launching new apprenticeship standards in conjunction with our employers. It’s important to understand the main differences between a ‘standard’ and the old apprenticeship ‘framework’. We’ve put together five frequently asked questions to help differentiate the two.

1. What do Standards entail?
Apprenticeships are commonly associated with a practical skillset and application. ‘Standards’ take this one step further, with an equal emphasis on the knowledge our learners develop and the behaviour that our employers require, making for a more ‘well-rounded’ experience for everyone involved. This is known as Knowledge, Skills and Behaviour.

2. Who designs Standards?
The new Apprenticeship Standards have been designed by employer ‘trailblazer’ groups. What may surprise you is that the minimum number of employers needed to design each standard is 10 – this is to ensure the content delivered consistently reflects the industry demands.

3. How are Standards summarised?
The summary for each Standard will be no longer than two pages, making it easier for both employers and learners to understand what is required, and included in the Standard. The most important information such as job role, duration of programme, knowledge, skills, and behaviour and what qualifications are available will be clearly stated in the summary.

4. How are Standards assessed?
Apprenticeship frameworks were achieved through on-programme assessment, which involved the assessor and their learner building a portfolio of work over the duration of the programme. With the new Standards, this has changed to an ‘end-point assessment’, which is carried out at the end of a programme and allows the learner to show everything they have learnt during this time. Each standard will differ, but the most common methods of EPA include; work-based observation, written tests, review of work and professional discussions.

5. Have all Frameworks been replaced?
New Standards are being approved each day as new job roles and skill areas are identified, but there are still frameworks that have not been replaced just yet. The funding for these will continue (albeit reduced). For example; JTM will continue to offer learners and employers Apprenticeship Frameworks in Leadership & Management L5 and Business Administration until a Standard replaces them.

If you have any questions about the new Apprenticeship Standards, please contact us by phone today on 01513369340, by e-mail at info@jarvis-eu.com or speak to an agent on our live chat.

International Women’s Day!

Today is International Women’s Day, and the campaign theme is ‘Be Bold For Change’.

“International Women’s Day celebrates the social, economic, cultural and political achievement of women. Yet progress has slowed in many places across the world, so global action is needed to accelerate gender parity. In 2016 leaders across the world pledged to take action as champions of gender parity – not only for International Women’s Day, but for every day. Groups and individuals also pledged their support. In 2017, if leaders are seeking to declare their bold action via the IWD website and show their support for women’s advancement, please see details.”

How does this relate to apprenticeships?

Well, young women are falling short in apprenticeships, being misrepresented, achieving poorer outcomes and being paid less than their male counterparts, according to a report from the Young Women’s Trust charity.

The report suggests that in sector subject areas such as engineering, there are less women making up the numbers than ten years ago. Nadia Khomani, editor at the Guardian states: “For every female apprentice working within engineering, there are 25 male apprentices”.

Click here for more information on The Young Women’s Trust.

One of the main problems is that over 50% of young women apprentices are only interested in five subject areas – the same proportion of young men generally work across ten areas. There are also a greater number of women to men who do not secure full-time employment after their apprenticeship. In 2016, Mike Thompson, director of apprenticeships at Barclays, labelled the findings “worrying”.

Jarvis Training Management are a proud advocate of equality and diversity and would like to invite you all to celebrate #InternationalWomensDay with us.

For more information on our apprenticeships, courses or training, contact us today on 01513369340, e-mail at info@jarvis-eu.com or speak to an agent on our live chat!

© Jarvis Training Management Ltd.

National Careers Week!

This week is National Careers Week! Bringing training providers, students and employers together through a range of activities and events until Friday 10th March.

Founded by volunteers with experience in business, education and careers advice, this week is to celebrate educational achievements and give employers the exposure they deserve.

National Careers Week is encouraging NHS organisations to promote the service and raise young people’s awareness in schools, colleges and training centres across the country.

This is also an opportunity for employers to showcase the success stories of apprentices that have successfully gained employment through themselves.

More importantly, this week is to raise awareness on how important good careers education is in schools and colleges nationally, and this is something JTM are proud to be a part of.

It’s also National Apprenticeship Week, so if you’d like to find out more about the apprenticeships, courses or training we provide, get in touch by phone on 01513369340, by e-mail at info@jarvis-eu.com or speak to an agent on our live chat!

© Jarvis Training Management Ltd.

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