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Are you interested in an apprenticeship?

What’s an apprenticeship?

It’s a genuine job, with training, meaning you can earn while you learn and gain the necessary skills and professional competencies in your chosen career.

 

What can I earn?

The minimum wage for apprentices is £3.50 per hour, but many employers pay more than this. This is dependent on the sector, region and apprenticeship level e.g. some higher apprenticeships pay up to £500 per week.

More details on salaries and entry criteria in specific apprenticeship occupations can be found on GOV.UK and search ‘apprenticeships’.

 

What levels are there?

All apprenticeships include elements of on the job and off the job training leading to industry recognised standards or qualifications. Some apprenticeships also require an assessment at the end of the programme to assess the apprentice’s ability and competence in their job role.

 

What’s in it for me?

  • Earn a real wage
  • Be trained in the skills employers want
  • You are more likely to progress quicker and higher than a typical student
  • Learn at a pace that suits you and be supported by a mentor
  • Have annual holidays
  • You will set yourself up for the future – apprentices enjoy marked salary increases when they complete their training, and those completing a higher apprenticeship could see increased earnings of an estimated £150,000 over their lifetime.

 

Entry requirements

Apprenticeships are available to anyone over the age of 16, living in England. There are different entry requirements depending on the sector and job. 7

Recent legislation has come into effect which changes the minimum English and maths requirements needed to complete an apprenticeship for people with a learning difficulty or disability. The changes will lower the English and maths requirements for these apprentices to an Entry Level 3 qualification.

A Disability Confident Employer will generally offer an interview to any applicant that declares they have a disability and meets the minimum criteria as defined by the employer. For more details search Disability Confident on GOV.UK.

Employer guide to apprenticeships

What is an apprenticeship?

An apprenticeship is a genuine job with an accompanying assessment and skills development programme. It is a way for individuals to earn while they learn gaining valuable skills and knowledge in a specific job role. The apprentice gains this through a wide mix of learning in the workplace, formal off-the-job training and the opportunity to practise new skills in a real work environment. Apprenticeships benefit employers and individuals, and by boosting the skills of the workforce they help to improve economic productivity.

How do they work?

Apprentices must spend at least 20% of their time on off-the-job training, however, they may need more than this if, for example, they need training in English and maths. It is up to the employer and training provider to decide how the off-the-job training is delivered. It may include regular day release, block release and special training days or workshops. It must be directly relevant to the apprenticeship framework or standard and can be delivered at the apprentice’s normal place of work if it is not part of their normal working duties. It can cover practical training such as shadowing, mentoring, industry visits and attending competitions. On-the-job training helps an apprentice develop the specific skills for the workplace and they should be supported by a mentor. Once an apprentice completes their apprenticeship they should be able to demonstrate that they can perform tasks confidently and completely to the standard set by industry.

Who are they for?

Individuals over the age of 16, spending at least 50% of their working hours in England over the duration of their apprenticeship and not in full-time education can apply for an apprenticeship. Employers can offer apprenticeships to new entrants or use them to grow talent from among current employees. Apprenticeships equip individuals with the necessary skills knowledge and behaviour they need for specific job roles, future employment and progression.

Benefits of hiring apprentices

Hiring an apprentice is a productive and effective way for any business to grow talent and develop a motivated, skilled and qualified workforce. Employers who have an established apprenticeship programme reported that productivity in their workplace had improved by 76% whilst 75% reported that apprenticeships improved the quality of their product or service. Other benefits that apprenticeships contribute towards include:

  • Increasing employee satisfaction
  • Reducing staff turnover
  • Reducing recruitment costs

What is an apprenticeship?

An apprenticeship is a genuine job with an accompanying assessment and skills development programme. It is a way for individuals to earn while they learn gaining valuable skills and knowledge in a specific job role. The apprentice gains this through a wide mix of learning in the workplace, formal off-the-job training and the opportunity to practise new skills in a real work environment. Apprenticeships benefit employers and individuals, and by boosting the skills of the workforce they help to improve economic productivity.

How do they work?

Apprentices must spend at least 20% of their time on off-the-job training, however, they may need more than this if, for example, they need training in English and maths. It is up to the employer and training provider to decide how the off-the-job training is delivered. It may include regular day release, block release and special training days or workshops. It must be directly relevant to the apprenticeship framework or standard and can be delivered at the apprentice’s normal place of work if it is not part of their normal working duties. It can cover practical training such as shadowing, mentoring, industry visits and attending competitions. On-the-job training helps an apprentice develop the specific skills for the workplace and they should be supported by a mentor. Once an apprentice completes their apprenticeship they should be able to demonstrate that they can perform tasks confidently and completely to the standard set by industry.

Who are they for?

Individuals over the age of 16, spending at least 50% of their working hours in England over the duration of their apprenticeship and not in full-time education can apply for an apprenticeship. Employers can offer apprenticeships to new entrants or use them to grow talent from among current employees. Apprenticeships equip individuals with the necessary skills knowledge and behaviour they need for specific job roles, future employment and progression.

Benefits of hiring apprentices

Hiring an apprentice is a productive and effective way for any business to grow talent and develop a motivated, skilled and qualified workforce. Employers who have an established apprenticeship programme reported that productivity in their workplace had improved by 76% whilst 75% reported that apprenticeships improved the quality of their product or service. Other benefits that apprenticeships contribute towards include:

  • Increasing employee satisfaction
  • Reducing staff turnover
  • Reducing recruitment costs

For further information see the link below:

Employer_guide_to_apprenticeships_03.11.2017

 

Top anti-bullying tips:

  • It doesn’t matter what colour hair you have; what trainers you are wearing; how you speak; how you walk; how you talk – it is not your fault if you get bullied. We are all different in some way and that’s what makes us amazing.
  • Whether you are a boy or a girl, old or young, big or small – bullying makes you feel rubbish and it’s okay to be upset about it. The important thing is that you tell someone about it.
  • Keep a record of what happened, when it happened, and who was involved. If the bullying is online, keep the evidence – save or copy any photos, videos, texts, emails or posts.
  •  It can be tempting if you are being bullied to retaliate – for example to send a horrible message back to someone; to try and embarrass and hurt the other person, or to fight back. This is not a good idea– you might end up being seen as the trouble maker or get yourself even more hurt.
  • Remember to be kind to other people! Just because someone is different to you and your friends – that doesn’t mean you are better than them or have a right to make them feel bad. If you mess up, say sorry. You don’t have to be friends with everyone – but you should always show respect, make it clear that you don’t like it when people bully others, and stick up for people who are having a hard time.

    Take a look below at JTM’s poster for anti-bullying week !

anti bullying week poster (social media) 

 

 

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At JTM, we look at education in a whole new way. With a work based approach to learning, we can ensure that you will gain all the experience and qualifications that you need to progress in your career!

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